Your Sunday Sinatra: “Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars” – Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim

“I who was lost and lonely… believing love was only… a bitter tragic joke, have found with you, the meaning of existence, oh my love”

“Corcovado” (known in English as “Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars”) was written by Anotnio Carlos Jobim and had been recorded in the early sixties by both Sergio Mendes and Miles Davis before becoming an international success when a version included on 1964’s landmark bossa nova album Gilberto/Getz , with lyrics by Gene Lees and vocals by Astrud Gilberto.  The Gilberto version is below.  Sinatra’s 1967 version from the bossa nova album Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim  follows after the jump.

quiet_nights_of_quiet_stars_gilberto.mp3

Hear Frank Sinatra’s “Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars”

Your Sunday Sinatra: “Baubles Bangles and Beads” – Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim

Some day… he may… buy you a ring, ringa-linga. I’ve heard that’s where it leads. Wearin’ baubles, bangles, and beads…

There’s no one bigger than The Chariman of the Board.  Hop on over to the local bar where people know your name and ask just about anyone:

 

“Baubles, Bangles and Beads” is my third Sinatra post in a row from the 1967 Bossa Nova album Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim, definitely one of Frank’s best. The song is from the 1953 American musical Kismet, set in Baghdad in the times of The Arabian Nights.

The show won the 1954 Tony for Best Musical and was made into a film by MGM in 1955, starring Howard Keel, Ann Blyth, and Dolores Gray who has her own tribute post right here at Tv Food and Drink.

Take a listen to Frank’s charmingly woozy version below:

Click to listen to Frank Sinatra’s “Baubles, Bangles and Beads”

Your Sunday Sinatra: “Dindi” – Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim

“Like a river that can’t find the sea… that would be me… without you, my Dindi.” 

“Dindi” is the second track off the 1967 album Francis Albert Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim.  The song was composed by Jobim especially for Brazilian jazz samba and bossa nova singer Silvia Telles, nicknamed “Dindi.”

Click through to listen to Frank Sinatra’s “Dindi”

Your Sunday Sinatra: “The Girl from Ipanema” – Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim

Sinatra’s cover of the landmark 1962 Bossa Nova song from the album “Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim”

Reward yourself with three minutes and nineteen seconds to let Frank Sinatra and Anonio Carlos Jobim remind you of why Sundays were invented with the woozy, relaxed swing of “The Girl from Ipanema,” embedded below.

Listen – Click HERE

Listening To: “The Girl from Ipanema” – Getz, Gilberto, Jobim

“The Girl from Ipanema”  (“Garota de Ipanema”) was written in 1962 by Antonio Carlos Jobim with original Portuguese lyrics by poet Vinicius de Moraes. The song became famous worldwide with its inclusion on the 1964 landmark Bossa Nova album Getz/Gilberto. Jobim originally composed the music at his home in the seaside Ipanema distritc of Rio De Janeiro. The photo above is of the girl who inspired the song, Heloísa Pinheiro.

Listen to the Original “Girl from Ipanema” Here!

Listening To: “Change Partners” – Frank Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim

You have to select your Bossa Nova music very, very carefully.  The five or six truly great years of the period are far outnumbered by the decades of cheap synthetic knock-offs that wafted through elevator cars, hotel lobbies and dental offices for decades thereafter.  Many dismiss Bossa Nova as cheeky and vapid, and that’s not surprising, because much of it is.

But when the real deal – the music of early forces Gilberto Gil, Stan Getz and Antonio Carlos Jobim caresses your ears, you can readily understand why so many lesser talents wanted to get in on the sound.

Continue reading “Listening To: “Change Partners” – Frank Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim” »